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Science & Research

Serra Rx80 Science & Research

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Testimonials are Individual Results. Your results may vary. Copyright © 2004 Biomedic Labs. All rights reserved Terms & Conditions.


The Problem with Pain
Systemic enzymes are a key to a healthy lifestyle. Processed food, exposure to environmental toxins and occasional illness cause the body to use up these enzymes, forcing it to work even harder to synthesize these enzymes and use them in the many complex reactions that take place every moment in our bodies.

Many people reach for NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen to address pain and inflammation. They are effective but come with serious side effects such as gastric bleeding, joint/cartilage damage, disrupted metabolism, increased blood sugar, loss of bone and emotional disorders, among others. In July 1998, The American Journal of Medicine stated the following about NSAID-related gastrointestinal and metabolic complications:

"Conservative calculations estimate that approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each year among arthritis patients alone. The figures of all NSAID users would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally under-appreciated."

An all-natural systemic enzyme, serrapeptase is a biocatalyst which stimulates and modulates the body's own intrinsic capacity to recover from injury?with hardly any side effects.

How do SU's relate to IU's?
Enzyme activity is often measured through a FCC (Food Chemicals Codex) or USP (United States Pharmacopeia) assays and is denoted by IU, or international unit. Some enzymes don't have a standard FCC or USP assay, such as serrapeptase. However, Japanese Pharmacopeia (JP) has established an activity assay specific for serrapeptase, which measures activity in SU, or serrapeptase unit.

You may see IU or SU used interchangeably on different serrapeptase products. While we do not know what sort of assays other companies use to test their enzymes, you can still compare the activity level on a one-to-one basis. So 80,000 IU is 80,000 SU, but SU is specific to serrapeptase.

Unlike other supplements, the weight (mg) of an enzyme supplement carries no significance. It is not the amount but the potency, or activity, of the enzyme that really matters. Guaranteeing the ingredients are available to the body is more important than how much of the ingredient is listed on a supplement label.

Research
Serrapeptase has been thoroughly researched for its numerous and diverse effects on inflammation, pain, infection and healing.

Researchers in India conducted a study to assess the response of serrapeptase in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). They wanted to determine if a conservative, non-surgical approach would be beneficial. Twenty patients with CTS were evaluated clinically after 6 weeks taking serrapeptase. Sixty five percent showed significant clinical improvement, which was supported by improvement in electrophysiological parameters. No significant side effects were observed. The doctors concluded that serrapeptase therapy may prove to be a useful alternative conservative treatment.1

A clinical evaluation of serrapeptase was conducted to determine its efficacy in reducing inflammation in patients with breast engorgement. Serrapeptase was noted to be superior to placebo for improvement of breast pain, breast swelling and induration and while 85.7% of the patients receiving serrapeptase had "Moderate to Marked" improvement. No adverse reactions were reported with the use of serrapeptase. The researchers conclude that serrapeptase is a safe and effective method for the treatment of breast engorgement.2

A prospective study was conducted on the effect of serrapeptase on post-operative swelling and pain of the ankle. In the serrapeptase group, the swelling decreased by 50% on the third post-operative day, while in the control groups (no treatment and treatment with ice) no reduction in swelling occurred. A decrease in pain correlated for the most part with the reduction in swelling. On the basis of these results, serrapeptase would appear to be an effective preparation for the post-operative reduction of swelling, in comparison with the classical conservative measures, for example, the application of ice.3

The efficacy of serrapeptase was evaluated in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 193 subjects suffering from acute or chronic ear, nose or throat disorders. After 3-4 days' treatment, significant symptom regression was observed in serrapeptase treated patients. Statistical comparison confirmed the greater efficacy of serrapeptase against all the symptoms examined. It was concluded that serrapeptase has anti-inflammatory, anti-edemic and fibrinolytic activity and acts rapidly on localized inflammation.4

Serrapeptase is widely used in clinical practice in Japan. One research trial in Japan investigated the effect of serrapeptase on sputum properties and symptoms in patients with chronic airway diseases. After 4 weeks of serrapeptase treatment, sputum output, viscosity and sputum neutrophil count decreased significantly. In addition, the frequency of coughing and of expectoration also decreased. The researchers concluded serrapeptase may exert a beneficial effect on mucus clearance by reducing neutrophil numbers and altering the viscoelasticity of sputum in patients with chronic airway diseases.5

An unusual clinical trial evaluated the effectiveness of serratiopeptidase in the eradication of a periprosthetic infection (an infection at the site of an implanted orthopedic device) in an in vivo animal model. Infections of slime-forming bacteria are especially difficult at these sites. Rats were inoculated with Staphylococcus epidermidis at the prosthetic site. After two weeks, infection persisted in 63.2% of animals in the no-treatment group; 37.5% of animals in an antibiotic-only group; and only 5.6% of animals in the serratiopeptidase-and-antibiotic group. The authors conclude that serratiopeptidase was effective at eradicating infection in this experimental animal model and may enhance antibiotic efficacy in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.6

Clearly, the potential applications for Serra RX80® are many and varied. Whether the application is fibrinolytic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antibacterial, a mucolytic expectorant, as well as others, Serra RX80 is the cutting edge in systemic enzyme therapy.

 

References
1. Panagariya A, Sharma AK. A preliminary trial of serratiopeptidase in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. J Assoc Physicians India. 2000 Nov;48(11):1130.
2. Kee WH, Tan SL, Lee V, Salmon YM. The treatment of breast engorgement with Serrapeptase (Danzen): a randomised double-blind controlled trial. Singapore Med J. 1989 Feb;30(1):48-54.
3. Gerngross H, Fabian A. Reduction of postoperative swelling. Objective measurement of swelling of the upper ankle joint in treatment with serrapeptase-- a prospective study(German). Fortschr Med. 1989 Feb 10;107(4):67-8, 71-2. Esch PM,
4. Mazzone A, Catalani M, Costanzo M, Drusian A, Mandoli A, Russo S, Guarini E, Vesperini G. Evaluation of Serratia peptidase in acute or chronic inflammation of otorhinolaryngology pathology: a multicentre, double-blind, randomized trial versus placebo.J Int Med Res. 1990; 18(5):379-88.
5. Nakamura S, Hashimoto Y, Mikami M, Yamanaka E, Soma T, Hino M, Azuma A, Kudoh S. Effect of the proteolytic enzyme serrapeptase in patients with chronic airway disease. Respirology. 2003 Sep;8(3):316-20.
6. Mecikoglu M, Saygi B, Yildirim Y, Karadag-Saygi E, Ramadan SS, Esemenli T.
The effect of proteolytic enzyme serratiopeptidase in the treatment of experimental implant-related infection. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jun;88(6):1208-14.